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AM Calling Frequencies



160 Meters: 1.885, 1.900, 1.945, 1.985
75 Meters: 3.825, 3.870 (West Coast), 3.880, 3.885
40 Meters: 7.290, 7.295
20 Meters: 14.286
17 Meters: 18.150
15 Meters: 21.285, 21.425
10 Meters: 29.000-29.200
6 Meters: 50.4 (generally), 50.250 Northern CO
2 Meters: 144.4 (Northwest)
144.425 (Massachusetts)
144.28 (NYC-Long Island)
144.45 (California)

Where can I find the most AM activity?
AM can be used anywhere SSB can be used within your license privileges since they're both phone modes. The exception is 60 Meters.
The ARRL has a detailed frequency chart that can be downloaded HERE.
To maximize your chances of finding AM QSOs or to get a response when calling CQ in AM, try these "AM Hotspots":

Band
Frequencies
Best Times
160 Meters
1.880-1.885, 1.930, 1.945, 1.975-1.995 mHz
Some mornings prior to or not long after sunrise, Evenings
80 Meters
3.730-3.740, 3.870-3.890 mHz
Mornings to mid-day, late afternoons, and evenings
40 Meters
7,160, 7.280 - 7.295 mHz
Late mornings, afternoons, and early evenings
20 Meters
14.286 mHz
Daylight hours
15 Meters
21.425 mHz
Propagation dependent
10 Meters
29.000 - 29.200 mHz
Propagation dependent
6 Meters
50.4 mHz
Propagation dependent
These commonly used frequencies can be good starting points. As activity grows, expand to other frequencies to prevent congestion and excessively large round tables. As always, PLEASE be considerate of existing QSOs and Nets, and ensure that the frequency is clear before calling “CQ, AM Rally”.

Band Frequencies Best Times
160 Meters 1.880-1.885, 1.930, 1.945, 1.975-1.995 mHz Some mornings prior to or not long after sunrise, Evenings
80 Meters 3.730-3.740, 3.870-3.890 mHz Mornings to mid-day, late afternoons, and evenings
40 Meters 7,160, 7.280 - 7.295 mHz Late mornings, afternoons, and early evenings
20 Meters 14.286 mHz Daylight hours
15 Meters 21.425 mHz Propagation dependent
10 Meters 29.000 - 29.200 mHz Propagation dependent
6 Meters 50.4 mHz Propagation dependent


AM Activity typically takes place around the following frequencies:
160: 1.875 to 1.890 MHz, also 1.945 MHz and also around 1.990 MHz. Call Frequency: 1.885 MHz.
80: 3.690 to 3.725, 3870 to 3890 MHz, also 3.945 MHz. Call Frequency: 3.885 MHz.
60: AM Not Permitted.
40: 7.290 to 7.295 MHz. Call Frequency: 7.290 MHz.
30: CW ONLY Band
20: 14.280 to 14.290 MHz. Call Frequency: 14.285 MHz.
17: No AM Activity Observed
15: 21.400 to 21.445 MHz
12: No Am Activity Observed
10: 29.000 to 29.100 MHz. Call Frequency is 29.000 MHz.
6: 50.400 to 50.550 MHz. Call Frequency is 50.400 MHz.
2: 144.400 MHz. 
The above frequencies are not consdiered to be AM only; they are areas on the dial where AM activity can be heard. Please be considerate when operating AM and listen first before transmitting to see if the frequency is clear, as you would with any other mode.
Fun Notes:
Retired Marine Radios that originally operated from 2 to 3 MHz, AM, can be easily re-crystaled for the top end of 160 meters. Listen for AM at 1.990 MHz, you may run into an OP using one of these former-marine radios.
29 MHz is fun when the band opens. Cheap fun can be had by re-crystalling a 5 watt CB hand-held for 29.0 and another frequency in this part of the band. They work great locally, providing greater coverage than a typical 2 meter hand-held/rubber duck, and at times, DX contacts can be made using one of these radios.
Bob Allison, WB1GCM



Old DDS Steps

* 1810
* 1910
* 3560
* 3985
* 7040
* 7285
* 10106
* 14060
* 14285
* 18096
* 21060
* 21385
* 24906
* 28060
* 28885

Pal DDS Steps

* 1885
* 3825
* 7290
* 10106
* 14286
* 18150
* 21285
* 29000